barrio2barrio:

#MujeresMuralistas #1970s #SanFrancisco has had a strong presence for groundbreaking works by Latinas #chicana #latina #cultura #murals #womanandmurals

(via queerandpresentdanger)

“Female job applicants with children are 44 percent less likely to be hired for a job than are childless women with similar qualifications. Fathers, by contrast, are 19 percent MORE likely to be hired than are comparably qualified men without children.”
— "Getting a Job: Is there a Motherhood Penalty?" American Journal of Sociology, 2007 (via checkprivilege)

(via primadonna-grrrl)

soilrockslove:

hellomynameismaddy:

did you know that disabled people hold the record for the longest occupation of a US federal building?

disabled people are hardcore and don’t you forget it

And the Black Panthers helped by bringing food!

(via blackmagicalgirlmisandry)

peakskeletonism:

class-struggle-anarchism:

In a weird way this almost makes me want to give credit to US conservatives, at least they distrust more mainstream media than they trust… unlike the “liberals” who just blanket trust everything that isn’t blatantly hard right.

This shows the important function that Fox News performs for the American “left”, they are the really bad guys who make everyone else good by default. All these people thinking they’re really savvy and discerning because they don’t buy the blatant propaganda of Fox, while swallowing whole the only slightly less blatant propaganda of every other network hook line and sinker.

ugh the Economist

voiceofnature:

Valais blacknosed sheep. Although the earliest mention of it dates back to 1400, this large, docile mountain sheep was first recognised as a separate breed in 1962. It has adapted particularly well to life in the high Swizz mountains and grazes even on the steepest, stoniest slopes. The black patches on its nose, eyes, ears, knees, hocks and feet and otherwise light woolly coats make it quite unmistakeable.
voiceofnature:

Valais blacknosed sheep. Although the earliest mention of it dates back to 1400, this large, docile mountain sheep was first recognised as a separate breed in 1962. It has adapted particularly well to life in the high Swizz mountains and grazes even on the steepest, stoniest slopes. The black patches on its nose, eyes, ears, knees, hocks and feet and otherwise light woolly coats make it quite unmistakeable.
voiceofnature:

Valais blacknosed sheep. Although the earliest mention of it dates back to 1400, this large, docile mountain sheep was first recognised as a separate breed in 1962. It has adapted particularly well to life in the high Swizz mountains and grazes even on the steepest, stoniest slopes. The black patches on its nose, eyes, ears, knees, hocks and feet and otherwise light woolly coats make it quite unmistakeable.
voiceofnature:

Valais blacknosed sheep. Although the earliest mention of it dates back to 1400, this large, docile mountain sheep was first recognised as a separate breed in 1962. It has adapted particularly well to life in the high Swizz mountains and grazes even on the steepest, stoniest slopes. The black patches on its nose, eyes, ears, knees, hocks and feet and otherwise light woolly coats make it quite unmistakeable.
voiceofnature:

Valais blacknosed sheep. Although the earliest mention of it dates back to 1400, this large, docile mountain sheep was first recognised as a separate breed in 1962. It has adapted particularly well to life in the high Swizz mountains and grazes even on the steepest, stoniest slopes. The black patches on its nose, eyes, ears, knees, hocks and feet and otherwise light woolly coats make it quite unmistakeable.

voiceofnature:

Valais blacknosed sheep. Although the earliest mention of it dates back to 1400, this large, docile mountain sheep was first recognised as a separate breed in 1962. It has adapted particularly well to life in the high Swizz mountains and grazes even on the steepest, stoniest slopes. The black patches on its nose, eyes, ears, knees, hocks and feet and otherwise light woolly coats make it quite unmistakeable.

(via marxistfeministsport)

museum-of-artifacts:

Inky paw prints left by a cat on a 15th century manuscript.

(via artforbabies)

(via ghostofcommunism)

jimeng-xi:

have some cute pitbulls!
jimeng-xi:

have some cute pitbulls!
jimeng-xi:

have some cute pitbulls!
jimeng-xi:

have some cute pitbulls!

jimeng-xi:

have some cute pitbulls!

(via bruja-ja)

“It must be remembered that there was still enough wheat, oats, barley, butter, eggs, beef, pork, and lamb in Ireland, even in this famine year of 1847, to feed for a year four times as many people as were leaving the country. But all this produce was still being sent to Liverpool on the very same ships that carried the emigrants.”

(via thar-cionn)

Pretty much everything we get told about the famine when growing up here in Britain paints it as an unavoidable tragedy, with any mistakes being on the part of the Irish, and with Britain as the charitable saviour.

This is not true. The Great Famine, as with many other “natural” disasters, was a political issue, with the ruling classes at fault. Britain may not have had any control over the blight, but it certainly had a hand in creating the conditions that made it such a disaster.

(via runofthemillsocialist)

Ireland AND India were both victims of man made famine from the British Empire. While the British working class we’re being sent down cramped coalmines with their entire families while still going hungry.

The Golden Age of Britain is one of the most evil things in history.

(via bobsavage)

(via ghostofcommunism)